Aquaponics in the Greenhouse

Grandpa's greenhouse
Stacked beds support the aquaponics system installed in the greenhouse

The method of stacking growing beds to save space and add height within the green house was developed at the Distillery in Taos. Using a wire mesh to form the curved walls, Quick-crete is smoothed on to fill in the wall structures. The little walls are only buried a few inches, so the beds are connected underneath, allowing the roots of the plants to grow unconstrained. The walls serve not only as growing containers, but as a stepped buttress to support the weight of garden dirt across the top portions of the beds. The top level, seen here as under construction, is connected to the pond as a closed, aquaponics system. Filled with a growing medium, there is a pump that flushes water from the pond through the bed a couple of times a day. Bringing nutrients in the form of fish waste to the plants, their roots in turn filter the water clean for the fish before the water cascades back into the little pond. We have found that watercress abounds in this bed, offering nutrient dense greens through winter months. Raised beds on the right offer a comfortable work space, warmed by the sun in winter and offering a lovely view, overlooking the Mill Pond.

Thatcher Gray paints pollinators
Dreaming of spring: Thatcher Gray paints pollinators on the old painted floors of the 1835 farm house connected to the SEED Barn.