Pierce’s Pond Woodland Path

The woodland path is a short trail that runs adjacent to the meadow and follows the fish ladder downstream. Find a sign at the end that follows the history of the site. We are working with plant communities that come from upland dry forests of the area.

Juliet Nalweyiso sports slippers as she sows seeds around the woodland path during COVID
The ‘before’ shot, just after the trail was structured.
Many native flower seeds need cold stratification to germinate. Directly sowing seeds onto open ground in winter is the best way to initiate a restoration because the plants become established in this particular soil from the get-go.
Seed mandalas were created by local students, this one tucked under the boulder…
Seeds sown as mandalas flourish in the following years
During the fall, native wildflower ‘plugs’ are added to the site. These plugs were cultivated from seeds started the prior winter at local schools and allowed to grow out through the summer to develop root systems before being added to the field. Cooler autumn temperatures ease the transition.
Rings of shells mark the new plantings, using natural materials connected to the sea as a nod to the opening of the fish passage. The minerals in the shells eventually break down to enrich the soil.
Plants start filling in the path area, but note the right uphill area, where too much mulch impedes the establishment of new plants
Dutch landscape architect, Mixy Montague visits the site and plants a few shade loving plants. Along the upper side of the trail, a LOT of mulch was laid down. After 3 years we can see where plants have taken hold and where the mulch is impeding growth. As we address the invasive Bishop’s weed in the meadow, we will pull from the areas of thick mulch to top the hugelcultures while opening ground to receive native seed.
The woodland path overlooking the small meadow to the fish ladder as it fills in with native large leaf wood aster and shade loving Virginia Wild Rye. As the plants fill in, we will continue to diversify the selection of natives.