Accidental Migrants

Installation of migratory birds who connect the ecologies of Acadia & Ayiti for the 2019 Ghetto Biennale

Accidental Migrants
Sorting through open source images of Ruby-throated hummingbirds & cedar waxwings. Both birds are considered ‘accidental migrants’ from the northeast. The woodworking community that makes up Lakou Basile are carving representations of these photographs to learn relationships of flowers with pollinating hummingbirds & fruit dispersal through birds. The woodblocks will be sent to the SEED Barn and used to demonstrate printing techniques of Ukiyo-e style of woodblock printing during the 2020 season. In hopes this exchange ignites consideration of geographic relationships and how we maintain ties to lands which host migratory wildlife we enjoy throughout the Maritime region during the summer.
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated hummingbird defending her territory
Basile Wesner
Basile Wesner installs images sourced from the commons through his home during the 2019 ghetto biennale
Rossi Jacques Casimir
Rossi Jacques Casimir is instigating this project & is credited with the documentation in this article.

birdSEED: Explore! Outdoors

Following the ecological rhythm of the seasons, SEED programs engage a network of schools and land stewards at the intersection of art and ecology to promote long term restoration. Building habitat for birds and pollinators through providing accessible platforms for community participation develops a sense of our relationships with the natural world, which we feel is essential to the effectiveness of conservation work. Drawing inspiration from the ancient art of weaving practiced in the area, we will gather in August to weave winter homes for birds and weave together native plant communities cultivated in the SEED network of steward gardens. In so doing, we weave together communities of people in the act of ecocultural restoration. In collaboration with Explore! Outdoors and the Blue Hill Public Library, we intend to create a woven sculpture immersed in the landscape of the SEED Barn meadow, using only materials found on site so that the works may disintegrate back into the landscape. The act of creating these woven structures allows us to think about traditional relationships with the land while exploring the animal species who could potentially use the shelter while overwintering nearby. Summer visitors are particularly encouraged to attend so they may return home to apply this method in more urban areas.

SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED
Participants fill the moist meadow of the SEED Barn to gather materials to integrate into our habitat sculpture.
SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED
The structure echoes the perpendicular lines between the fallen trunk, branches and ground, creating a framework into which were inserted small scale, nest like sculptures.
SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED
SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED nest
Nest inspired sculpture made of natural materials during the workshop.
SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED
Nest forms woven on a larger scale in the meadow.
SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED
SEED Barn Maine - birdSEED winter
The nest inspired sculpture settles into the landscape over the winter.