2020 SEED engagements

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March 29th:
SEED Swap & Scion Exchange
MOFGA Common Ground Education Center, 10am – 4pm
Installation of the SEED Sensorium & dispersal of Native Grasses
Join us for the 3rd year of installing the SEED Sensorium, pick up seed saving information and native grass seed to support habitat for pollinators. Find us in the alcove, next to the exchange.

April 4th:
Master Gardener Symposium: Gear Up for Gardening
Moore Center, 12:30 – 4:30-5pm
Creative Frameworks for SEED Dispersal ~ Lee Lee
Working at the intersection of art and ecology, Lee Lee will present her methodology in cultivating creative frameworks for public engagement around wild land restoration. Material will include cultivating networks of living SEED libraries, SEED Sensoria, HugelCULTURE and following seasonal rhythms to respond to specific attributes of place in culturally relevant ways. 
Other workshops include: Grow your best Veggies by Marjorie Poronto of the Master Gardeners Extension program, Grow your best raspberries by David Handley, UMaine, Biodiversity by Reeser Manley, Creating a community garden, Edible Millbridge, and Improving soils by Paul and Karen Volkhausen of Happytown Farm.

April 4th: Sweetgrass talk with Carol Dana
Part of the Blue Hill Heritage Trust’s winter lecture series

May 9th 1 – 3pm
Garden Day at the Blue Hill Heritage Trust
Learn what native seeds may be sown in spring and collect native grass seeds to take home and plant for pollinators. A workshop on composting will be presented by master gardener, Zabet NeuCollins.

May 23rd 9am – noon
Blue Hill Public Library Plant Sale
Find SEED under the apple tree as we disperse spring sown native grasses and wild mint along with sipping tea and drawing pollinators who benefit from these meadow plants

The above events cancelled or postponed due to COVID 19

May 23rd 2-4pm (rain date May 24)
Mapping the Labyrinth Meadow workshop at Tapley Farm
As a community, we will map out the geometric path that will be maintained at Tapley Farm in Brooksville as a collaboration between the Tent Project, the Open Air Arts Initiative and SEED :: disperse. The labyrinth will offer a platform on which to creatively explore our relationship with the meadow landscape. Challenging the dominant local mowing practice of severing this important part of local ecology, this event kicks off a series of workshops to educate people on how to maintain meadows in ways that best support the pollinator and bird communities that are essential to healthy natural systems.

May 30
Alewife Festival at Pierce Pond
Join the Penobscot Alewife Committee, the Blue Hill Heritage Trust & SEED to celebrate the maturing landscape around the restored fish ladder into Pierce Pond. Learn about the plants that make up shoreline communities and the network of life supported by them.

July 11 – 27th: SEED Barn Artist in Residence: moira williams
Learn more about moira’s walking based creative practice:
I-Park Kicks off Seventh Art Biennale in East Haddam

July 25th 2-4pm (rain date July 26)
Embodying the Landscape: Walking the Labyrinth
We invite the community to walk the labyrinth with intention as we explore the plant communities that make up the meadow at the Tapley Farm. We will speak of how important it is to hold off on mowing our meadows until November by paying attention to the teaming life that fills the maturing meadow. We will think about the localized movement of pollinators as they weave their way through the landscape and think about the shelter provided by tall grasses for seed dispersers who call the meadow home. Open source images of the network of life that abounds in meadows will be available for creative exploration through words, movement and drawing.

August 22nd 10a-4pm
Blue Hill Maritime Festival
Discover the colonial medicine chest and tea gardens at the Pendleton House with the establishment of a new SEED library dedicated to preserving these heirlooms brought to Maine from across the sea.

October 3rd 2-4pm (rain date October 4)
Meadow Restoration workshop at Tapley Farm
We will look at techniques for restoring meadows for the final event in the Labyrinth series in collaboration with the Tent Project and the Open Air Arts Initiative. Thinking about the transformation from flower to seed, we will look at the community of seed eating birds who are supported by mature meadows as they migrate south for the winter. We invite people to wait until November to mow so as not to disrupt this important food source for the birds. Autumn is the best time for planting plugs and we will share techniques on how to best introduce native plants to meadow environments to broaden the diversity of what is growing around us.

October 8-12th: Terra Madre

Accidental Migrants

Installation of migratory birds who connect the ecologies of Acadia & Ayiti for the 2019 Ghetto Biennale

Accidental Migrants
Sorting through open source images of Ruby-throated hummingbirds & cedar waxwings. Both birds are considered ‘accidental migrants’ from the northeast. The woodworking community that makes up Lakou Basile are carving representations of these photographs to learn relationships of flowers with pollinating hummingbirds & fruit dispersal through birds. The woodblocks will be sent to the SEED Barn and used to demonstrate printing techniques of Ukiyo-e style of woodblock printing during the 2020 season. In hopes this exchange ignites consideration of geographic relationships and how we maintain ties to lands which host migratory wildlife we enjoy throughout the Maritime region during the summer.
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated hummingbird
Ruby-throated hummingbird defending her territory
Basile Wesner
Basile Wesner installs images sourced from the commons through his home during the 2019 ghetto biennale
Rossi Jacques Casimir
Rossi Jacques Casimir is instigating this project & is credited with the documentation in this article.

Riddle me this…

I have no ears, but I listen by feeling vibrations.

The only colors I can see are red, green & yellow, but a vast array of colors can be displayed on my scales.

I taste through my feet and I like to eat rotting fruit and poop.

I have no nose, and smell things through my antennae.

I breathe through spiracle holes in my body.

My exoskeleton is related to crabs and lobsters.

I can fly when my body is warmer than eighty six degrees Fahrenheit.


What am I?

Make a drawing sharing your ideas for the answer
Tag @seed.disperse on Instagram with the resulting drawings

SEED the Untold Story at the Halcyon Grange

SEED: The Untold Story is a documentary that follows passionate seed keepers who are protecting a 12,000 year-old food legacy. In the last century, 94% of our seed diversity has disappeared. A cadre of 10 agrichemicals companies, including Syngenta, Bayer and Monsanto, control over two-thirds of the global seed market, reaping unprecedented profits. Farmers and others battle to defend the future of our food.

www.seedthemovie.com

Following the film will be a discussion led by Lee Lee, founder of The SEED Barn in Blue Hill.  Drawing inspiration from the Slow Food approach to activism expressed around a shared table, Lee Lee has initiated The SEED Barn as a platform for cultivating a local network of seed stewards that include trust lands, farms, regional schools, public libraries and private land holders. She is also instigating a parallel project in Haiti, which shares a dual focus of heirloom preservation and wildland restoration.

Free event. Donations accepted.
Family friendly, all are welcome.

 

SEED Sensorium
Bridging art and science, these activities engage all of the senses in learning about the remarkable world of seeds and their utmost importance in our lives. Participants are encouraged to look through the lens of the seed to explore their personal connections to the natural world.

SEED matters :: Heirloom seed EXCHANGE
With seeds granted by the Seed Savers Exchange as part of the Seed Matters heirloom preservation program, we are building a foundation for a community seed library based in the SEED Barn in Blue Hill. Bring seeds you have been saving to contribute to the library as we gather seeds that hold significance for this community. Browse from a variety of crops to take home and grow out over the next growing season. Get tips on saving vegetable and fruit seeds. http://seedmatters.org

SEED dispersal: Native grasses and spring sown wildflowers
Learn how we may use our land to enhance pollinator habitats while sharing ideas on how we invite into our spheres the pollinators essential for growing food. Take home seeds for your own garden and help augment pollinator habitat across the peninsula.

SEED Saving Workshop, Children’s activities & Film Screening

Thursday, February 22nd
4:30 pm: Family friendly seed sensorium and dispersal

Stories and hands-on activities for children inspired by the remarkable world of seeds.

5:30 pm: Soup’s on!
Family meal with soups, mac ‘n cheese & homemade breads

6:00 pm: Film screening of SEED the Untold Story

Followed by a discussion with Lee Lee, founder of the SEED Barn.

Halcyon Grange
1157 Pleasant St, North Blue Hill, Maine 04614,
www.halcyongrange.org
SEED :: disperse:
www.virtualvoices.org,
207.374.2947, lee-lee@virtualvoices.org

SEED Senorium at the grange
SEED Sensoiurm activities at the Grange
SEED Sensorium: Smell me
Smell me seeds made up of culinary spices as part of the SEED Sensorium
SEED dispersal
SEED Dispersal – wildflowers and native grasses to support pollinators
Pine Cone Bird Feeders
Supporting birds in winter with local lard mixed with peanut butter & seeds! Other festive seeds that may be used (and dispersed by the birds) are staghorn sumac and wild rose. These festive berries add a flash of red to the feeders.

Sow Dry Seed

SEED Barn Maine
The community gathers to collect wildflower seeds and sift through the heirloom seeds donated by Seed Matters.

Native SEED dispersal

Workshop demonstrating how to sow native plant seeds to grow pollinator pathways.
Take home sown seeds for your own garden and help plant a few to establish a native plant nursery for the Blue Hill Heritage Trust. These gardens, along with a network of regional school gardens, will be used to restore wildland ecology across the Peninsula.
http://bluehillheritagetrust.org

SEED matters :: Heirloom seed EXCHANGE
With seeds granted by the Seed Savers Exchange as part of the Seed Matters heirloom preservation program, we are building a foundation for a community seed library. Bring regional heirloom seeds you have been saving to contribute to the library as we gather varietals specifically of this area. Browse from a variety of crops to grow out over the next growing season. Get tips on saving vegetable and fruit seeds. Learn how we may use our land to augment pollinator habitats while sharing ideas on how we invite into our spheres the pollinators essential for growing food.

Seed Matters: “Seed is the first link in the food and fiber chain. And the chain is only as strong as its weakest link. The Clif Bar Family Foundation created Seed Matters to improve the viability and availability of organic seed to ensure healthy, nutritious and productive crops. Together with our partners and folks just like you, we’re making a noticeable difference – from seed to farm to table. Simply put, our three main goals are:

Conserve crop genetic diversity.
Promote farmers’ roles and rights as seed innovators and stewards.
Reinvigorate public seed research and education.”
http://seedmatters.org

Seed Savers Exchange: “We conserve and promote America’s culturally diverse but endangered garden and food crop heritage for future generations by collecting, growing, and sharing heirloom seeds and plants.” https://www.seedsavers.org

SENSORIUM Crafting

Drawing from the strong handworks movement maintained on the Blue Hill peninsula, makers are invited to participate in the creation of an open sourced set of educational tools. The SEED Sensorium is a multi-sensorial exploration of seeds. Bridging art and science, this series of activities engage the senses in learning about the remarkable world of seeds and their utmost importance in our lives. The activities draw inspiration from the Emilia Reggio philosophy of immersive education which promotes student led, experiential programs as the most engaging way to cultivate understanding of the world around us. Participants are encouraged to look through the lens of the seed to explore connections between art and science and their personal connections to the natural world. We would like for the material to be regionally specific, so invite creatives of all ages to contribute to the making of the works.

More information on the SEED :: disperse project: www.virtualvoices.org
The SEED barn is open in winter by appointment: 207.374.2947

Wildflower SEED display at the SEED Barn Maine
Wildflower seed display for dispersal of native plants at the SEED Barn
Planting native seeds for community restoration
Instructions on sowing native wildflower seeds are important as many people feel it is effective to cast the seeds into an established space. However, native flowers are slow growing and need to gain a foothold before being introduced to the field.
The greenhouse is the ideal winter workshop.
Greg Cradick SEED photography
Installation of Greg Cradick’s photographs of urban weed seedheads
Bayberry seeds
Native bayberry seeds are waxy and were used by colonists to scent candles. The leaves are a pot-herb and called ‘bayberry’ for the similar taste to European Bay leaves.
SEED library
A reference library includes a collection of books addressing food justice issues.
Milkweed seeds & Monarch butterflies
A dispersal of several varieties of milkweed native to the area is complemented by an accordion book showing the transformation of monarchs in relationship with the milkweed plant.
Heirloom seeds at the SEED Barn Maine
Heirloom seeds donated by Seed Matters & collected from the MOFGA seed swap were offered to participants to simply try their hand at saving them.

Jardin Katelyn

Katelyn Alexis in her garden
Katelyn stands in her garden, with medicinal Vervain growing on the left & a local spinach on the right.
Tropical vervain
Tropical variety of Vervain.
seed saving
Saving seeds from the local spinach
Papillon by Katelyn Alexis
Papillon by Katelyn Alexis 2017
moira williams installing lambi peau
moira williams prepares the back area of the Garden after installing the banner created during the feast for Azaka in Lakou Claude.
moira williams in the garden
moira williams installs ‘lambi peau’ painted earlier during a workshop led by Kombatan. This symbol of freedom marks the young moringa & mango trees.
Atis Katelyn Alexis
Katelyn works on pollinator blocks with her son.
pollinator blocks
Community made Pollinator blocks for the SEED Sensorium
baby moringa
Young moringa trees arrived from the nursery at Sakala
moringa
Planted with care

Lakou Jean Claude Santillus

Jean Claude Santillus
Figures sculpted by Jean Claude Santillus watch over the engagements
SEED Sensorium - Pollinate
Observational drawing is paramount to learning. Open source images of indigenous birds and pollinators guide the drawing workshop in Lakou Claude.
Workshops are run alongside a feast prepared with lots of vegetables, from which we save seeds.
Lee Lee demonstrates seed saving techniques for various vegetables
The biggest, most beautiful beans are preserved for planting
Papouche with chili seeds.

SEED :: disperse | Haiti

2017 Ghetto Biennale

Two years after installing pocket gardens in the previous biennial, we examined the gardens of the Grand Rue to assess which plants thrived. We used what we learned in growing plants in a heavily populated area of the city to apply what worked to the areas that did not fare as well. We found that trees fared the best, and that joumou (the local pumpkin) can easily trail along rooftops. At our workshops, we share a meal with joumou, then plant seeds with the youth who in turn tend the seedlings and in time have a product to sell or trade which supports food security. In response to an aggressive program to hybridize Haitian heirloom seeds, we started weaving a network of SEED Stewards across the urban areas of Port Au Prince in order to preserve open source access to traditional seed stock while providing a continued connection to the natural world for urban youth. The Biennial installation included the development of a SEED Sensorium created in collaboration with local youth as well as a collaborative installation with Jean Claude Santillus curated from seed related art works created by members of the Atis Rezistans collective.

Explore:
Jardin Katelyn

Lakou Basile

Lakou Claude

A visit to SAKALA

Jean Claude Santillus, Haiti
Lakou Jean Claude Santillus: Left – Claude plants a banana tree as part of the 2015 Ghetto Biennial, photo by Rossi Jaccques Casimir – right: a year later the tree is thriving, intertwined with his moringa. photo by Richard Arthur Flemming

How Do I Get My Food?

This is an activity appropriate for young students. A silhouette of a child and a seedling are presented on the same scale. Prompts on how each takes in nutrients are provided, and placed by participants around the appropriate silhouette. Some statements are appropriate for both, so are placed in the middle. Younger students will need assistance in reading the prompts. Early readers may use it as an opportunity to practice reading.

For mobility and ease of storage, the silhouettes may be sewn with felt. The prompts may then be mounted on matte board, with small pieces of Velcro attached to the back. This allows the pieces to be attached easily and moved around.

PROMPTS:

Give off moisture

Legs

Arms

Mouth

Air

Stems

Water

Earth

Sunlight

Roots

Leaves

I absorb nutrients through my roots

I absorb sunlight through my leaves

I absorb sunlight through my skin

I absorb nutrients from the environment right around me

I take food through my mouth

I process nutrients through my digestive system

I process nutrients through photosynthesis

I breathe in oxygen & breathe out carbon dioxide

I absorb carbon dioxide & give off oxygen

I have to collect, grow or buy food

I drink water through my mouth

I absorb water through my roots

I absorb sunlight

 

Activity developed by SEED Taos

Treasure Chest: Exploring Metaphor

Seeds provide a thought-provoking platform to explore metaphor, which in turn can provide insight into the importance of seeds. Older students may explore ideas like diversity and migration on a platform of poetry. Younger children benefit from prompts offered by objects they may handle to aid in a conversation about seeds.

The materials used in this activity are flexible and should be chosen to stimulate conversation about the different quality of seeds. Written prompts complement related objects and are housed in a small ‘treasure chest’ or suitcase.

Offering objects helps younger children think of our relationship with seeds in new ways.

How is a seed like…

…a grandmother?

…technology?

…a treasure chest?

…a sailing ship?

…a present?

…jewelry?

…a suitcase?

…a turtle?

…a chain?

Activity developed by SEED Taos