Hugel CULTURE demonstration

The first season at the SEED barn involved a lot of work taking down invasive plants and folding them back into the earth in a Hugelkultur fashion. Mid way through the season, the Blue Hill and Brooklin Garden Clubs visited the grounds in a demonstration on how we are using available materials to build Hugelkultures. Conversation on why it is important to address invasive plants ensued since many invasives are initially introduced as decorative garden plants. Bringing attention to the fact that many nurseries, especially in the big box stores, continue to sell invasive plants is important to know for avid gardeners.  Below, we see an example of a Hugelkultur bed in the second season as new plants become established. An introduction to the SEED Library offered members new ideas on what native plants could potentially be worked into the landscape. The tour ended with a description of how to tie in an aquaponic system into the small scale terracing approach developed by grandpa in the new greenhouse.

 

Aquaponics in the Greenhouse

Grandpa's greenhouse
Stacked beds support the aquaponics system installed in the greenhouse

The method of stacking growing beds to save space and add height within the green house was developed at the Distillery in Taos. Using a wire mesh to form the curved walls, Quick-crete is smoothed on to fill in the wall structures. The little walls are only buried a few inches, so the beds are connected underneath, allowing the roots of the plants to grow unconstrained. The walls serve not only as growing containers, but as a stepped buttress to support the weight of garden dirt across the top portions of the beds. The top level, seen here as under construction, is connected to the pond as a closed, aquaponics system. Filled with a growing medium, there is a pump that flushes water from the pond through the bed a couple of times a day. Bringing nutrients in the form of fish waste to the plants, their roots in turn filter the water clean for the fish before the water cascades back into the little pond. We have found that watercress abounds in this bed, offering nutrient dense greens through winter months. Raised beds on the right offer a comfortable work space, warmed by the sun in winter and offering a lovely view, overlooking the Mill Pond.

Thatcher Gray paints pollinators
Dreaming of spring: Thatcher Gray paints pollinators on the old painted floors of the 1835 farm house connected to the SEED Barn.

A Blank Canvas

The foundation of the greenhouse was excavated as one of
the first alterations of the land around the SEED Barn in 2016.

Vast expanses of lawn cropped short surrounds most homes in rural Maine. While it is a sought after aesthetic for many old timers, it is not a landscape that offers support for local wildlife. For pollinators, lawn is a vast desert with little in the way of food or shelter. In this windy place by the sea, it meant that we had few pollinators dwelling here. Known as the ‘Manor House’, the family who sold us the property practiced this common but ecologically disruptive way of landscaping. Not only does it lack protection for wildlife, it consumes quite a lot of gas to keep it maintained. We have focused on changing this method of working with the land to cultivate pollinator friendly spheres around our new home.

Grandpa has always prioritized his greenhouse, building them in urban settings as well as rural ones, and he even designed his dream-house as a casita wherein the greenhouse took up a third of the floorplan. Here we can see his first mark to disrupt the overwhelming expanse of lawn. Ultimately, a new foundation needed to be dug for the barn in order to save the structure. We trailed that dirt across the front of the property as a large berm which doubles as native plant garden and protection from road noise. After building the greenhouse, the lawn has been steadily shrinking as we build berms, sink hugelcultures and roto-till swaths of grass to explore various methods of meadow restoration and cultivation of nourishment by the sea.