Meadow Mandala

Meadow Mandala at the SEED Barn Maine
Thatcher Gray basks above the completed Meadow Mandala in the wet meadow alongside the SEED Barn.

Broadening perceptions of HOME to include outdoor spaces helps cultivate an understanding of the interrelationships between humans and wildlife. As for humans, good homes for wildlife include plenty of food, safe access to water and shelter, and enough space to raise the next generation. In this outdoor workshop, participants are invited to create an on-site, mandala inspired sculpture woven through the meadow landscape that will provide winter habitat for seed dispersers.

In the process, we learn how to work with natural materials in our own gardens to augment habitat for wildlife through winter months.

This is the final installment of the 2019 Open Air Arts Initiative Field Works, a collaboration between the Blue Hill Heritage Trust, Cynthia Winings Gallery & the SEED Barn. The culmination exhibition will take place at Parker Point the weekend of September 27-29.
https://www.facebook.com/events/596899880842603/

The SEED Barn is located at 53 Falls Bridge Road in Blue Hill Falls www.virtualvoices.org
http://www.openairarts.org/
https://bluehillheritagetrust.org/

Meadow Mandala at the SEED Barn Maine
Exploring different methods of working with materials on site, participants share ideas as the spiral form of the mandala is established
leaf chain
A leaf chain is woven with yarn and Norway maple leaves from the eradication of the invasive tree on another part of the property.
Leaf chain for the Meadow Mandala
Assembling the Meadow Mandala at the SEED Barn Maine
Working together to assemble the Meadow Mandala
Meadow Mandala at the SEED Barn Maine
The finished mandala
Meadow Mandala in winter. The structure persists into the winter and highlight the animal passages through the underbrush.
Mandala in Winter

¡Pollinate! Artsweek at GSA

Pollinator sculpture hung from the trees

Broadening perceptions of HOME to include outdoor spaces beyond our walls helps cultivate an understanding of the interrelationships between humans and pollinators. As for humans, good homes for pollinators include plenty of food, safe access to water and shelter, and enough space to raise the next generation. Developing the awareness of what is available beyond our fencelines, we may fill in the gaps to support movement of pollinators through our own spheres. The movement of pollinators like bees, butterflies, beetles & moths is highly localized. During the spring we think about the ways that pollinators navigate our gardens, filling in gaps in bloom time with native flowers and ensure there is enough tufting grass to provide protection. In this workshop, students from the George Stevens Academy constructed pollinator homes out of hollow stems, drilled holes in dead wood and sculpted stacks of branches in the staghorn sumac grove above Wardwell Pasture during their Artsweek creative workshops. We used material from a tree that had needed to be cleared because of the proximity to the road by which it had fallen because we don’t like to disrupt in-tact ecologies by taking out materials that make up existing systems. Our tools included a drill, hacksaw, twine, hammer and a single nail. The sculptures persisted through the seasons, slowly melting back into the landscape over time.