Valerian

Valeriana officinalis

Valerian flowers

Valerian is a calming herb. Traditionally, all parts of the plants have been consumed, and use has been recorded since the ancient Greek and Roman times. The Saxons would eat the roots along with other tubers and the leaves like salad. The 16th century English herbalist, John Gerard describes how the dried root was valued as a medicine by the poor in the north of England and the south of Scotland, so that “no broth or pottage or physicall meats be worth anything if Setewale [Valerian] be not there.” He stated that it was good for bruises and could help with coup, a recommendation supported by the 17th century astrological botanist, Nicholas Culpeper who said the root should be boiled with liquorice, raisons and aniseed to ease a cough.

The Mayo clinic states that many studies have shown that it ‘may reduce the amount of time it takes to fall asleep and help you sleep better’. However, they recommend developing the aptitude for falling to sleep through lifestyle choices instead of taking supplements. Studies have shown that it takes a regular dosage over several weeks for the herb to be most effective. The European Medicines Agency states that valerian can be used as a traditional herbal medicine to relieve mild nervous tension and to aid sleep. In Connecticut and New Brunswick, Valerian is considered invasive.

Sources: Mayo Clinic, Wikipedia, Please note that material provided here is for informational purposes only and are not to be taken as recommendations for treatment.

Valerian seedhead

Lakou Basile

Basile Wesner
Basile Wesner’s sculpture of a doctor installed next to a newly planted mango, under the medicinal trees that make up the canopy of his garden.
Lakou Basile
Young moringa and mango planted in a pocket garden in the woodcarving community that make up Lakou Basile. The woodcarvers here are able to supply woodchips that have been broken down over time under their lathe operations. This is the site that hosted the first wood block carving workshops of the 2019 Ghetto Biennial: Revolution