ART for UKRAINE

Orchestrated by Daniela Garza

Friday, April 15th, 2022 4-7pm
Walker Fine Art – 300 W 11th Avenue, Denver

Women for Women International

Identifying credible partners on the ground and allocating resources to help address the unmet needs of women  residing in war and conflict ridden areas. From their website, “The lives of Ukrainian women have been shattered by the Russian invasion. More than 2 million people have fled the war—most of them women and children. Through our Conflict Response Fund, we are identifying credible partners on the ground and allocating resources to help address the unmet needs of women facing this crisis.”

Voices of Children

Providing psychological services to children traumatized by war, specifically in Ukraine. From their website: “None of a child may be left alone with a war trauma. This is our mission. With your help, we give psychological and psychosocial support to children who suffered as a result of war operations. It helps them to win the consequences of the war and develop themselves. We also help families to cope with everyday difficulties, treatment and rehabilitation of children, giving an individual support. To give children a voice we create a video content, and we are also engaged in promoting children rights in order to change the children’s rights protection system in the country. Our objective is that every child who has suffered from the war in Ukraine must get psychological help in time. Our values: respect to child’s dignity and rights; understanding of the needs of every child to be heard; faith in getting the best results only with the help of partnership and mutual aid. We are working in various villages and towns along the frontline in Donetsk and Luhansk regions.”

Slow Food International
Raising funds to support Ukraine in two ways:

1) Saving Ukrainian biodiversity. To support those farmers who, even in wartime, have not left their farms and continue to work under the most difficult conditions, risking their lives to preserve the animal breeds and plant varieties they grow in order to nourish their local community and feed the future. We are making a plea to the global Slow Food community to support them financially with a donation.

2) Keeping knowledge alive. To create matching opportunities between Ukrainian Slow Food Community members and their counterparts throughout Europe, thus allowing for refugee farmers and food producers to be hosted by fellow producers to facilitate a meaningful opportunity for learning and exchange. Beekeepers to be matched with beekeepers, cheesemakers with cheesemakers, and so on. We believe this exchange will not only allow for Ukrainian food producers to keep practicing their trades in exile but will be a fruitful exchange of skills: skills which will be vital for the post-war reconstruction of the country.

Make way for Seedlings!

We are on lockdown in Maine as we try to ‘flatten the curve’ of the Covid-19 global pandemic. Early on, we recognized the broader impacts of food insecurity that is being faced now and will unfold over the short season in Maine. Over the winter, we grew lots of vegetables in the greenhouse and now it is time to harvest some for our kitchen and more to pass on to our local food pantry. We have made it our goal to share something fresh from the garden every week during food box distributions through the seasons. Last fall, the Blue Hill Garden Club under the leadership of Peter Leonard (Grandpa) started a new public garden on Tenney Hill in the town of Blue Hill. Little did we know just how important this new space will be in providing fresh nourishment for our neighbors. Working with the Downeast Gleaning Initiative, Healthy Peninsula and the Blue Hill Heritage Trust, we are not only growing food for free distribution to the members of our community in greatest need, we are developing a platform for education on seed saving. The run on seeds this season has sparked great interest in saving seeds. We are trying out several ways to share how to save seed, why it is important and provide a platform for exchange and preservation of seeds for future growing season. For now, we are clearing out the greenhouse to fill it with seedlings that will be planted in the public garden later in the spring.

Our lettuce is going to seed, which we will sow through the season in the public garden, and the kale flourishes with plenty of greens to share. Rosemary maintains her happy home and offers nutrient dense leaves to share as full branches in the food pantry. Herbs are like super food! Even with the simplest meal, they add flavor and (more importantly) a dose of nutrients that are found in these culinary plants that are closest to the wild. They store easily when dried too.
Watercress flourishes in the aquaponic bed and the chard has grown into a giant!
Pickled beets to be – taken out of the dirt to make way for seedlings
Various pumpkins and squash emerge
Seedlings stay cozy under a late April snow.
Brassicas and onions – perfect planting companions
A new set of greens are planted in the terraced beds.

Secret Suppers by Cooking Studio Taos in the Distillery Gardens

Secret Supper by Cooking Studio Taos
Menu created by James Beard recognized chef, Chris Maher.
Chef Chris Maher in the Distillery Gardens
Chef Maher harvests the freshest salad from the Distillery Gardens just before dinner.
Salad plating at the Taos Distillery
Plating the salad – the Distillery kitchen was designed with wide, open countertops made of local granite to accommodate spreads like this.
Secret Supper Club in the gardens of the Taos Distillery
Guests start arriving to chat with the chef in the portico. Greeted with a drink and amuse bouche on the rooftop deck, we enjoy the view of Taos mountain with the sunset before sitting down at the table set up under the catalpa tree.
Taos Distillery plating
Valerie with Chef Chris Maher at the Taos Distillery
Seasonal soup by Chef Chris Maher
Carrot soup with curry & turmeric
Roast Quail with Bulgar & dried cherries served with sprouts & baby courgettes